• About Our Merger

    On February 1, 2017, the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (CBCF) joined forces.


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  • You Are Not Alone

    Whether you are living with metastatic breast cancer or have a loved one who is, it can be helpful to talk with someone who understands what you are going through. We are available to you.


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  • Questions related to breast cancer?

    Our team has the latest information about breast cancer and can answer questions about a diagnosis, treatments, what to expect, financial resources, coping, local support groups and more.


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  • Breast Cancer Screening

    Need help understanding breast cancer screening and what you should do? We created an online decision aid tool to help inform all women of the factors to consider and their options. Give it a try.


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Getting screened: my breasts, my test

In Canada, there are breast screening programs in each province and most territories. For women at average risk for developing breast cancer, mammogram screening is most effective every two years, between the ages of 50 and 74. (1) (2)

Mammography is the gold standard of breast cancer screening for most women. It uses low-dose x-rays at safe levels to take images – or mammograms – of the inside of the breasts. When deciding about breast cancer screening there are several factors to consider.


The Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation encourages women to learn about the benefits and limitations of participating in regular breast cancer screening and make an informed decision about what is right for them.


My breasts, my test is a new mammography decision aid that can help you make an informed decision about when to start going for regular mammograms and how often to get screened.


Visit my breasts, my test to:

•    Learn about the benefits and limitations of having regular mammograms
•    Find out what it’s like to have a mammogram and how to prepare before the test
•    Better understand the risks for breast cancer and consider your own risk factors
•    Receive a personalized screening guide with questions to ask your health care provider

References:

(1)

The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations on screening for breast cancer in average-risk women aged 40–74 years. CMAJ Can Med Assoc J. 2011 Nov 22;183(17):1991–2001.

(2)

Lauby-Secretan B, Scoccianti C, Loomis D, Benbrahim-Tallaa L, Bouvard V, Bianchini F, et al. Breast-Cancer Screening — Viewpoint of the IARC Working Group. N Engl J Med. 2015 Jun 3;372(24):2353–8.