• Thank You!

    National Volunteer Week is April 12 - 18! Thank you to our amazing volunteers who contribute their time, skills and passion in helping to create a future without breast cancer.


    Read More

  • Beauty for a Cause!

    The Shoppers Drug Mart Spring Beauty Gala is on Saturday, May 2nd. Find out more about attending this special event. Volunteer opportunities are also available!


    Learn More

  • A Brand New Website!

    Beyond the Lab shows you first-hand the progress being made from investments of donor dollars and how we are closer to creating a future without breast cancer.


    Visit Now

  • Get Involved!

    Visit your local Safeway store and show your support for the cause by donating $2 at any check stand.


    Learn More

  • Grant News!

    Community Health Grants have helped CBCF provide locally tailored breast cancer programs throughout the province. Four projects have just been awarded!


    Learn More

  • 1/3 of Breast Cancers can be Prevented

    Learn 10 other surprising facts about breast health and build your personal plan for living well.


    Create Your Breast Health Plan​​

You Are Here :

Upcoming Events

01
MAY

Safeway Awareness Weekend

Safeway locations across BC

All Canada Safeway stores across the country host ...


02
MAY

Shoppers Drug Mart

Shoppers Drug Mart locations ...

Twice a year, Shoppers Drug Mart Beauty Boutiques ...


02
MAY

Speed Rack

EAT! Vancouver Festival at BC ...

Come to Speed Rack, an international cocktail ...


02
MAY

Cruising with Hope

Princess Cruise Line, ...

What a perfect Spring getaway! Enjoy a three day ...


Hot Topics

Corporate Partners & Sponsors

Being Active for Your Breast Health

Regular physical activity helps improve your overall physical, emotional and social health and well-being. Another important reason to get more active is that this can lower your risk of breast cancer by as much as 25–30 per cent. 

How does physical activity reduce breast cancer risk?

It is not clear whether the reduction in breast cancer risk is related to physical activity alone or to a combination of factors. Women who are physically active may also be more likely to eat a balanced diethave a healthier body weightquit or avoid smoking and pursue other healthy behaviors​.

Research shows that body weight plays a role in breast cancer because fatty tissue produces hormones and growth factors that may promote cancer development. Research indicates that the level of these hormones produced by the body can be modified by physical activity.

Regular physical activity is beneficial for women of all ages, before and after menopause. It’s never too late to start: the benefits of regular physical activity exist even when you start later in life.

How much is enough?

Guidelines from the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology recommend the following for adults aged 18–64:

  • Get a minimum of 30 minutes per day or about 2.5 hours per week of moderate-to-vigorous aerobic physical activity, for example brisk walking, cycling, swimming, taking an exercise or dance class, or cross-country skiing.
  • Choose physical activities that you enjoy and will be more likely to continue. The activities you choose can be as simple as taking a brisk walk for 30 minutes, five days a week. Whatever you choose, aim to push yourself to break a sweat and breathe harder.
  • If you are already active for 30 minutes a day, try to work your way up to 60 minutes.
  • The activity can be broken up throughout the day in 10-minute bouts, at a minimum.
  • Add muscle and bone strengthening activities on at least two days per week. This includes brisk walking, jogging, or lifting weights.

If you are not a healthy weight, even a small weight loss may lower your risk of breast cancer. The best weight-loss formula involves low-to-moderate intensity activity over a longer period rather than short, intense bursts.

You may be more active than you think

Physical activity adds up and can include things like the following:

  •          Getting off the bus a couple of stops early and walking to your destination
  •          Taking the stairs instead of the elevator
  •          Taking a brisk walk after meals
  •          Raking leaves or gardening
  •          Taking regular stretch breaks throughout the day
  •          Dancing
  •          Walking the dog.
  •          Playing with your children

More Information

Sources

Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. (2011). Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines. Accessed July 31, 2011.

Friedenreich, C M & Cust, A E. (2008). Physical Activity and breast cancer risk: impact of timing, type and dose of activity and population subgroup effects. In British Journal of Sports Medicine 2008; 42: 636-647. Accessed October 12, 2011.

Johns Hopkins Breast Center – Artemis Bulletin. (October 2003). Exercise and Breast-Cancer Prevention: It's Never Too Late to Start. Accessed July 31, 2011.       

Public Health Agency of Canada. Physical Activity Guidelines. Accessed July 31, 2011.

National Cancer Institute. (2008). Delving Deeper into Exercise and Breast Cancer Prevention. In NCI Cancer Bulletin, Oct 21, 2008, Vol. 5, No. 21. Accessed July 31, 2011.

American Cancer Society. (2006). Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention. Accessed July 31, 2011. ​​​